peruvian-ginger-ale

Homemade Ginger Ale and a bit of history, starting with Ginger beer

Ginger Beer …. where it all started

Not a lot of people know that ginger ale was first manufactured here in Ireland back in the 1850s in Belfast by Thomas Joseph Cantrell, an Irish apothecary and surgeon. It was generally dark in colour, had a very strong flavour and was much sweeter than what contemporary taste buds are used to.

While carbonation was added in 1904 by John J. McLaughlin, a chemist and pharmacist, who had set up a soda water business in 1890. Initially called McLaughlin Belfast Style Ginger Ale. It was refined and called Canada Dry Pale Dry Ginger Ale. This was a dry style (also called the pale style), a paler drink with a much milder ginger flavour. Now a lighter colour and sharp taste. Mr. McLaughlin acquired a patent in 1907 for his ginger ale and is still similar to the ginger ale we can get today under the Canada Dry brand.

Though there is now lots of other ginger drinks about today, though from my research I believe some producers are interchanging the ale and beer word without there being any alcohol in the beer. Take for example Old Jamaican Ginger Beer, also Doc’s Ginger beer from Germany. Though there is now an Irish alcoholic Ginger beer called Zingibeer and this can be gotten in various off licenses in Dublin and some bars on tap as well.

Ingredients:

8 servings

  • 750ml Club soda/Sparkling water
  • 2 tbsp ginger syrup
  • lime juice
  • 8 lemon/lime peel, remove any of the white pith
  • bruised mint leaves to garnish

*this can all be adjusted to taste

Method:

  1. Place syrup, lime juice and ice into jug.
  2. Add club soda on top. Club soda is much sweeter than sparkling water, so if you’d like the sweetness to come from the syrup then go for the sparkling water.
  3. To bruised mint leaves, place in the palm of your hand and just use other hand to give them a rub to realise the flavour.
  4. Twist peel stripe over the glass, peel side down, to release the citrus oil onto the surface of the drink.

For a nice cocktail option, I like adding this to

  1. A shot of amaretto
  2. About 1/4 of the glass with cloudy apple juice
  3. Fill with the ginger ale
  4. Some ice and mint leaves

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Recent recipes

Homemade Ginger Ale and a bit of history, starting with Ginger beer

Ginger Beer …. where it all started

Not a lot of people know that ginger ale was first manufactured here in Ireland back in the 1850s in Belfast by Thomas Joseph Cantrell, an Irish apothecary and surgeon. It was generally dark in colour, had a very strong flavour and was much sweeter than what contemporary taste buds are used to.

While carbonation was added in 1904 by John J. McLaughlin, a chemist and pharmacist, who had set up a soda water business in 1890. Initially called McLaughlin Belfast Style Ginger Ale. It was refined and called Canada Dry Pale Dry Ginger Ale. This was a dry style (also called the pale style), a paler drink with a much milder ginger flavour. Now a lighter colour and sharp taste. Mr. McLaughlin acquired a patent in 1907 for his ginger ale and is still similar to the ginger ale we can get today under the Canada Dry brand.

Though there is now lots of other ginger drinks about today, though from my research I believe some producers are interchanging the ale and beer word without there being any alcohol in the beer. Take for example Old Jamaican Ginger Beer, also Doc’s Ginger beer from Germany. Though there is now an Irish alcoholic Ginger beer called Zingibeer and this can be gotten in various off licenses in Dublin and some bars on tap as well.

Ingredients:

8 servings

  • 750ml Club soda/Sparkling water
  • 2 tbsp ginger syrup
  • lime juice
  • 8 lemon/lime peel, remove any of the white pith
  • bruised mint leaves to garnish

*this can all be adjusted to taste

Method:

  1. Place syrup, lime juice and ice into jug.
  2. Add club soda on top. Club soda is much sweeter than sparkling water, so if you’d like the sweetness to come from the syrup then go for the sparkling water.
  3. To bruised mint leaves, place in the palm of your hand and just use other hand to give them a rub to realise the flavour.
  4. Twist peel stripe over the glass, peel side down, to release the citrus oil onto the surface of the drink.

For a nice cocktail option, I like adding this to

  1. A shot of amaretto
  2. About 1/4 of the glass with cloudy apple juice
  3. Fill with the ginger ale
  4. Some ice and mint leaves

Leave A Comment

Recent recipes